This Day In History: Hamilton-Burr Duel

220px-hamilton_small.jpg On July 11, 1804 in Weehawken, NJ, Jefferson’s first vice president Aaron Burr fatally shot his long-time political rival Alexander Hamilton, whom he had challenged to a duel. While we don’t recommend this mode of conflict resolution, if you would like to learn more about their relationship and the duel check out this Weehawken history site or this PBS site and the following books available at Guarini Library:                              

Alexander Hamilton and Aaron Burr: their lives, their times, their duel
Anna Erskine Crouse and Russel Crouse. Illustrated by Walter Buehr.
923.273 .H218C                          

Burr, Hamilton, and Jefferson : a study in character
Roger G. Kennedy
E302.5 .K46 2000                         

The  Burr-Hamilton duel & related matters; a statement
E302.6.H2 B87                              

The Duel : Alexander Hamilton, Aaron Burr, and the future of America
Thomas Fleming
E302.6.H2 F56 1999                         

A fatal friendship : Alexander Hamilton and Aaron Burr
Arnold A. Rogow
E302.6.H2 R64 1999                        

Interview in Weehawken; the Burr-Hamilton duel, as told in the original documents. Edited by Harold C. Syrett and Jean G. Cooke. with an introd. and conclusion by Willard M. Wallace.
E302.6.H2 S95                             

Ordeal of ambition; Jefferson, Hamilton, Burr
E302.1 .D35                              

Advertisements

2 Comments »

  1. Kyle Ulrich said

    While we don’t recommend this mode of conflict resolution, if you would like to learn more about their relationship and the duel check out this Weehawken history site or this PBS site and the following books available at Guarini Library:

    That was hysterical! I wonder who wrote that.

  2. […] Branch). Burr is the more famous/notorious of the two, having killed Alexander Hamilton in a pistol duel in Weehawken, N.J.,  as well as being tried for treason, while Hobart died from heart disease […]

RSS feed for comments on this post · TrackBack URI

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s