Plagiarism

 

Etymology:  A borrowing from Latin. Etymon: Latin plagiārius. < classical Latin plagiārius person who abducts the child or slave of another, kidnapper, seducer, also a literary thief (Martial 1. 52. 9), in post-classical Latin also (adjective) concerning plagiarism (15th cent.) < plagium   kidnapping (see plagium n.) + -ārius  -ary

-“plagiary, adj. and n.”. OED Online. March 2016. Oxford University Press. http://www.oed.com/view/Entry/144942 (accessed March 29, 2016

 

Charges of plagiarism are not limited to education. Historians, journalists, politicians, and government officials have all been accused of plagiarism; even rock gods are not immune from these accusations. In some areas, plagiarism is rampant – check out this June 5, 2016 article from The Atlantic.

 

What is your institution’s stance on plagiarism? Here is NJCU’s:  Academic Integrity Policy and from the 2009 Faculty Handbook

 

Sources

Avoiding Plagiarism (from the respected Purdue OWL – Open Writing Lab)

Plagiarism (from the American Historical Association. It is slightly dated, but it contains of wealth of information)

Plagiarism (selected articles from InsideHigherEd)

Plagiarism (selected articles from The Chronicle of Higher Education)

Plagiarism (University of North Carolina – Writing Center)

Retraction Watch (among other areas of chicanery examined, plagiarism ranks high)

 

 

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