Archive for Statistics

Updated Profile of Congress (September 12, 2018)

This statistical report highlights some of the main characteristics of Congress as a whole; it is updated as necessary throughout a Congressional term.

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Median Household Income Up, Poverty Rate Falls, and Health Insurance Coverage Rates Basically Unchanged

This information comes courtesy of the following reports: Income and Poverty in the United States: 2017 (income increased 1.8% over 2016 – this is the third year in a row of increases; poverty rates fell .4% – this is also the third consecutive year that this rate has fallen); and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2017.

More statistical breakdowns are available in each report.

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Wildfire Statistics

With the whole West seemingly on fire, this CRS publication – Wildfire Statistics – crams a lot of data into two pages. Current through August 1, it makes for a sobering read. And yes, things are getting progressively worse over time.

Is climate change having an impact on the frequency and severity of the fires? Here are some readings of interest: Is Global Warming Fueling Increased Wildfire Risks?   (Union of Concerned Scientists); Wildfires and Climate Change (Center for Climate and Energy Solutions); How Climate Change Contributed to This Summer’s Wildfires (New Yorker); and  Wildfire responses to abrupt climate change in North America (Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences).

 

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Getting a College Degree Does Matter

The Census Bureau has just released some charts showing the wage differences between those without a college degree and those with one. The annual median earnings gap is quite large in many of the hundreds of occupations listed. These tables also show that the wage-gap between men and women is real and still exists in all manner of employment.

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How Did the Great Recession Affect Higher Education Enrollment?

This new Census Bureau report – Postsecondary Enrollment Before, During, and Since the Great Recession – presents some statistical data that may surprise some people. Herewith are some observations:

  • The recession saw a 33 percent increase in enrollment in two-year colleges from 2006 to 2011. In 2010, 29 percent of all students enrolled were in two-year colleges. By 2015, this share had fallen to 25 percent, below the prerecession average level of 26 percent. However, the number of students enrolled in two-year colleges was still 10 percent above the level in 2006.
  • Compared to the prerecession period (2000 to 2007), male undergraduate enrollment was 18 percent higher postrecession (2012 to 2015). Female enrollment also grew, but only by 14 percent.
  • Hispanic college enrollment experienced growth through the recession and beyond. The number of Hispanics enrolled in college increased by 1.5 million — an approximate doubling (184.0 percent) of the prerecession level. Before the recession, 13.2 percent of Hispanics ages 15 to 34 enrolled in undergraduate college, while 20.2 percent of Hispanics enrolled in college after the recession. (Tipsheet)

Tables and figures, some with data back to 2000, add to the utility of this brief document.

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Health Statistics for America’s Largest 500 Cities

Emanating from NYU, the City Health Dashboard utilizes 36 key metrics in determining the health factors of a municipality. You can drill down these data to the census tract level in each city. Jersey City’s profile is replete with figures revealing the health and social indicators at the neighborhood level. You can also compare across cities as well as across metrics. There is much valuable information here; this is a source worth exploring.

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How Did New Jersey Do in the Latest “Nation’s Report Card”?

For those who are interested, you can come here for the state results for grade 4 and grade 8 mathematics; and here for grade 4 and grade 8 results for reading. Highlights on a national level are also accessible.

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