Archive for Climate Change

Recent Climate Change Reports

One Disaster Away (Center for Public Integrity) is a report series that will do deep dives into the four states most adversely affected by climate change, and how these states were instrumental in de-fanging the Obama-era Clean Power Plan; Ten Facts about the Economics of Climate Change and Climate Policy (from the Hamilton Project and Stanford University) investigates how climate change can have a deleterious effect on economic growth; Sea-level rise could flood hundreds of millions more than expected (MIT Technology Review); and Climate Change and Ecosystems (National Academies Press).

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California Wildfires in Pictures

This feature is from The New York Times. A picture can be worth a thousand words.

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As Sea Levels Are Predicted To Rise, See Where the Flooding Will Be

In light of last’s week climate report, you can also peruse this NOAA feature that shows how areas bordering the ocean will be affected by flooding. Just type in a city’s name and see the results.

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The World’s Oceans Rising Faster Than Initially Thought Due to Climate Change

This new report – Special Report on the Ocean and Cryosphere in a Changing Climate  – predicts dire outcomes as the world’s oceans continue to rise due in large part to the ice melts of both Greenland and Antarctica. This report, heavily referenced, details changes in the oceans, polar regions, high mountain areas, and coastal communities. But according to the report, there is still time to avert climatic disaster:

The far-reaching services and options provided by ocean and cryosphere-related ecosystems can be supported by protection, restoration, precautionary ecosystem-based management of renewable resource use, and the reduction of pollution and other stressors (high confidence). Integrated water management (medium confidence) and ecosystem-based adaptation (high confidence) approaches lower climate risks locally and provide multiple societal benefits. [Section C2 of Headline Statements]

But the time is now. CNN provides an informative overview of this major report. And this series of reports should also be consulted to gauge the human impact of sea level rising.

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As Climate Change Continues, the Heat Index Increases

The heat index is used by the National Weather Service to issue heat event warnings. This article – Increased frequency of and population exposure to extreme heat index days in the United States during the 21st century –  from Environmental Research Communications– posits that this measure of the “apparent temperature” will reach beyond the upper thresholds of this tool as more episodes of high heat are experienced, putting millions of people at risk. The combination of high heat and humidity will jeopardize many with the likelihood of heat stroke. We will have an adumbration of this condition this upcoming weekend. Stay out of the sun, limit physical activity, and stay hydrated.

 

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Climate Change is a Priority Health Issue

Against a background of soaring temperatures in northern Europe (100+ degrees), rainfall that has flooded parts of southern New Jersey, hail the size of golf balls in France, and in light of the upcoming UN Climate Action Summit, a number of United States medical /health groups have joined together to issue U.S. Call to Action on Climate, Health, and Equity: A Policy Action Agenda that states “Climate change is the ‘greatest public health challenge of the 21st century’.” This brief but cogent document outlines steps that must be taken to address this most pressing problem. Since climate change more adversely affects those already in dire straits, a social justice component in battling climate change is introduced.

 

 

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If You Think It’s Hot Now, Wait Until 2080

According to this study in Nature Communications – Contemporary climatic analogs for 540 North American urban areas in the late 21st century – climate change will so transform local weather that cities will then experience patterns akin to cities 280 miles south of them, so Washington, D.C. in 2080 will feel like Arkansas or Mississippi. As this article states: ” We show that climate of most urban areas will shift considerably and become either more akin to contemporary climates hundreds of kilometers away and mainly to the south or will have no modern equivalent.” (Abstract)

To see the visualizations for the 540 cities, please come here.

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