Archive for Research Tips

National Academies Press

The NAP is the publishing arm of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Medicine, and the National Academy of Engineering – all are among the most prestigious STEM organizations in the world and as such produces highly regarded monographs, reports, briefings, and consensus documents on a whole host of topics from agriculture to national security. Well over 9,000 volumes are freely available online, sorted into specific topic areas. If one listens to the news, one will inevitably hear about a report issued by the NAP; the latest one to inform the general public dealt with The Public Health Consequences of E-Cigarettes. One can always look at the latest releases section to see what new reports have been generated; more than 200 are published every year. And you can stay in touch with the NAP via various media platforms as well

 

 

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New Edition of Department of Defense Dictionary Published

This new iteration, correctly entitled DOD Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms, dated February 2018, incorporates new terms such as “maritime environment”. It also lists those terms that were removed/replaced as well as terms added or modified. For those researching the military sector, this work is especially useful for the specific definitions/contexts of terms one encounters.

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How To Spot Fake News

This is the title of a very informative piece from FactCheck.org; it’s what we librarians do on a daily basis.

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Selected Topics in Nursing

Three times a year, The Online Journal of Issues in Nursing, publishes Journal Topics that is an issue-driven examination of some important aspect of nursing. Each issue is edited by an expert in the field, the articles are professional and erudite, links are given where/when available, and the supporting bibliographies act as a guide to relevant literature. Sixty of these presentations have been published so far; they range from Cornerstone Documents in Healthcare to Compassion Fatigue: Caregivers at Risk. So if you are looking for a topic to explore, why not review those listed at this site?

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Old School Research

Before the Internet, before electronic catalogs and networks, how did researchers find the locations of books they needed? They relied on printed union catalogs – tools that listed the combined holdings of libraries. The largest one produced was nicknamed “Mansell” in honor of the publisher who produced the massive 754-volume The National union catalog, pre-1956 imprints ; a cumulative author list representing Library of Congress printed cards and titles reported by other American libraries. The title, however, is a misnomer; it was not a truly a “national” catalog but rather a guide to the holdings of major public and private libraries. This is not the place to have found what your town library held. But it was of immense help to scholars trying to track down copies of needed works; we can personally attest to its importance. An article detailing the history and the continued usefulness of this paper product in the electronic age can be found here.

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Plagiarism

 

Etymology:  A borrowing from Latin. Etymon: Latin plagiārius. < classical Latin plagiārius person who abducts the child or slave of another, kidnapper, seducer, also a literary thief (Martial 1. 52. 9), in post-classical Latin also (adjective) concerning plagiarism (15th cent.) < plagium   kidnapping (see plagium n.) + -ārius  -ary

-“plagiary, adj. and n.”. OED Online. March 2016. Oxford University Press. http://www.oed.com/view/Entry/144942 (accessed March 29, 2016

 

Charges of plagiarism are not limited to education. Historians, journalists, politicians, and government officials have all been accused of plagiarism; even rock gods are not immune from these accusations. In some areas, plagiarism is rampant – check out this June 5, 2016 article from The Atlantic.

 

What is your institution’s stance on plagiarism? Here is NJCU’s:  Academic Integrity Policy and from the 2009 Faculty Handbook

 

Sources

Avoiding Plagiarism (from the respected Purdue OWL – Open Writing Lab)

Plagiarism (from the American Historical Association. It is slightly dated, but it contains of wealth of information)

Plagiarism (selected articles from InsideHigherEd)

Plagiarism (selected articles from The Chronicle of Higher Education)

Plagiarism (University of North Carolina – Writing Center)

Retraction Watch (among other areas of chicanery examined, plagiarism ranks high)

 

 

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Law Library of Congress Legal Reports

At the behest of Congress, the library produces legal reports on various topics; they “… provide commentary and recommended resources on issues and events. These reports are provided for reference purposes only and do not constitute legal advice.” The reports can be heavily footnoted and links are provided where available. The documents range from Bitcoin practices in forty countries to Japan’s constitutional prohibition against waging war. If you need to research various subjects from a legal viewpoint, you might want to stop at this site.

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